New support for solicitors as legal profession tackles mental health issues

One in five solicitors will experience a mental health issue at least once in their career, says Legal Wellbeing Scotland 

A new collaborative initiative to promote and support mental health and wellbeing within the Scottish legal community is set to launch this week.
‘Legal Wellbeing Scotland’, which is being spearheaded by the Law Society of Scotland and driven by LawCare, a charity which provides support to the legal community, will bring together a range of legal and educational representatives to support solicitors, one in five of whom will experience a mental health issue at least once in their career.
Eilidh Wiseman, president of the Law Society of Scotland, said: “Law can be very demanding, and we know that one in five solicitors will experience a mental health issue at least once in their career.
“The goal of Legal Wellbeing Scotland is to promote improved mental health and wellbeing in the Scottish legal profession, by raising awareness and providing best practice solutions.
“This initiative provides a welcome opportunity to work collaboratively with experts from across the legal sector, as well as encourage individual organisations to explore what they can do within their own establishments.”
Twenty partners have so far joined the group. They are: the Law Society of Scotland, LawCare, Scottish Young Lawyers Association, Trainee and Newly Qualified Society Scotland, Society of Law Accountants in Scotland, Scottish Paralegal Association, Burness Paull, Pinsent Masons, Adams Law Blairgowrie, Grieve Grierson Moodie & Walker, FDA Procurators Fiscal section, Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service, Midlothian Council, Edinburgh University Counselling Services, Faculty of Advocates, Judicial Office for Scotland, Jack Grant & Co, Hamilton Ross Solicitors, Brodies Solicitors, and the Royal Bank of Scotland.
Trish McLellan, LawCare coordinator for Scotland and Northern Ireland, said: “LawCare has identified that there is very low awareness of the support and services available to those in the legal community, and that there is stigma attached to acknowledging mental health issues.
“There is also a lack of knowledge in the community itself about good practice in supporting people with mental health issues and what that looks like.”
Those involved Legal Wellbeing Scotland will bring representatives together to identify areas where collaboration will be beneficial; identify mechanisms for establishing and sharing best practice; identify how to improve the perception of mental health and wellbeing; and address stigma as a barrier to accessing support.
McLellan added: “We also need to consider how those in need of support can find it and trust it but, overall, we’re keen to develop tangible actions and solutions.”
For more information on Legal Wellbeing Scotland and its members, click here.
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